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CARING FOR YOUR ANDERSON BEAN BOOTS

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CARING FOR YOUR ANDERSON BEAN BOOTS

  1. Keep them clean!
    Regularly clean your boots with a good non-alkaline leather cleaner (like Lexol Leather Cleaner). Use a soft cloth and rinse with water. DO NOT USE SADDLE SOAP. It will dry out the hide.
  2. Condition your boots.
    Boot leather needs to have its natural moisture restored often with a good conditioner (like Lexol in the BROWN BOTTLE). Wax and polish is NOT a substitute for conditioner. Never condition boots prior to cleaning.
  3. Keep boots away from direct heat.
    When your boots get wet, the best way to dry your boots is to walk them dry. They may also be air dried away from all heat sources. DO NOT put them in front of a heater or dry them with a hair drier or blow torch. (Yes, we said blow torch. You should see some of the things that we have been asked to fix.)

CLEANING YOUR BOOTS AFTER A FLOOD

Mold and mildew attack leather and cause it to deteriorate. Start today with these simple steps to save and/or care for your boots.

For standard (non suede-finished) leathers:

  1. Rinse all dirt and crud inside and outside of the boots with water from a garden hose. City water is preferred over well water as it has a little chlorine to help kill the mold and mildew. However, well water will work just fine.
  2. Wash the boots inside and out with a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and distilled water to kill the mold and mildew. DO NOT RINSE the 50/50 mix off after applying.
  3. Allow the boots to dry naturally but OUT OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT or any heat source. Drying them inside with air conditioning is recommended.
  4. Wash and scrub them inside and out with a soft-bristled brush or rag using Lexol PH-balanced Leather Cleaner. If you can’t find the Lexol, use Ivory bar soap as a second option. It may take more than one wash and scrubbing to get them clean.
  5. Be certain to rinse all the soap off the boots after they are clean.
  6. Allow the boots to dry naturally again, inside with air conditioning. It may take more than 24 hours.
  7. After all dirt, mold and mildew are removed and the boots are DRY to the touch, apply a light coat of Lexol Leather Conditioner to the exterior and interior of the boots. Allow the conditioner to dry, and then apply a second coat of Lexol Leather Conditioner to the EXERIOR of the boots ONLY.
  8. When the boots are thoroughly dry, polish them with a lanolin-based boot cream.

*We do not recommend Mink Oil, Neatsfoot Oil or any one-step cleaner and conditioner for your boots. Please use ONLY Lexol Leather Conditioner that comes in the BROWN BOTTLE.

For suede-finished leathers:

  1. Rinse all dirt and crud inside and outside of the boots with water from a garden hose. City water is preferred over well water as it has a little chlorine to help kill the mold and mildew. However, well water will work just fine.
  2. Wash the boots inside and out with a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and distilled water to kill the mold and mildew. DO NOT RINSE the 50/50 mix off after applying.
  3. Allow the boots to dry naturally but OUT OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT or any heat source. Drying them inside with air conditioning is recommended.
  4. Wash them with Ivory Bar Soap using a soft brush or rag.
  5. Allow the boots to dry naturally again, inside with air conditioning. It may take more than 24 hours.

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